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Our Team

Shelley Goldman

Shelley Goldman

Shelley Goldman is a Principal Investigator of the d.loft STEM project and REDlab at Stanford. She is committed to understanding the ways that design thinking might have impact on K-16 education. She believes that today’s students will be tomorrow’s problem solvers if we make available and engage them in robust and meaningful education experiences. Goldman has been working at the intersection of STEM education research and development for over 25 years. She was the director and PI of several NSF ESI projects including the Middle-school Mathematics through Applications Project (MMAP), a research, development and teacher learning project to use technology to create the connections between real-life applications and school mathematics. That curriculum, built in partnership with middle school mathematics teachers, was designated a promising curriculum by both the mathematics and technology expert panels of the Department of Education. It has been published as both a comprehensive curriculum and as supplemental technology-integrated units. Goldman has also directed the NSF PRIMES project, to build parents confidence, awareness and ability to be supportive of standards-based math. Goldman has led research and development teams that have brought a variety of technology and media into learning settings such as the Go MATH!! Mobile apps for increasing families access to mathematics that are currently under research. With a degree from the Department of Family and Community education at Teachers College, Columbia University, Goldman is an educational anthropologist specializing in examining learning environments in and out of school, and works on understanding how technologies can jumpstart the learning process. She is a Professor at the Stanford University School of Education.

Maureen Carroll

Maureen Carroll

Maureen Carroll, Ph.D., is a co-Founder of Lime Design, and the Director of Stanford University’s REDlab (Research in Design & Education), a partnership between Stanford’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school) and School of Education. Carroll is adjunct faculty at Stanford University’s School of Education and has a Ph.D. in Education: Language, Literacy & Culture, from the University of California at Berkeley. She has taught at the elementary, middle school and college level. Dr. Carroll’s published work includes academic journals, children's literature, and textbooks. She has also presented educational research at the National Reading Conference, The International Reading Association, The American Educational Research Association, ACM Creativity & Cognition Conference, The IDC International Conference on Interaction Design & Children, The National Council of Teachers of English Research Assembly Midwinter Conference and presented workshops at The East Bay Independent School Association, California Independent School Association, the California Art Education Association, The Children’s Creativity Museum, and Head Royce’s Summer Institute for 21st Century Educators.

Bernard Roth

Bernard Roth holds a B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering. He has been a faculty member at Stanford University since 1962. He has been awarded honorary PhDs by the University of Paris and he University of Casino. He has published approximately 200 research papers in the areas of design, creativity, education, kinematics and robotics, and has received many awards for both his teaching and research. These include: seven Best Paper Awards (ASME), the Melville Medal and the Outstanding Design Educator Award (ASME), J. F. Engleberger Award (IFR), the Pioneer in Robotics Award (IEEE) and the Robotics and Automation Award (IEEE). He also serves as an industrial and government consultant, is a director of several corporations, and has held top leadership positions in several international professional societies. He is the organizer of workshops on creativity and personal effectiveness, and is one of the founders of Stanford’s “d-school,” where he now serves as Interim Director.

Sheri D. Sheppard

Sheri D. Sheppard, Ph.D., P.E., is professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. Besides teaching both undergraduate and graduate design and education related classes at Stanford University, she conducts research on engineering education and work-practices, and applied finite element analysis. From 1999-2008 she served as a Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, leading the Foundation’s engineering study (as reported in Educating Engineers: Designing for the Future of the Field). In addition, in 2003 Dr. Sheppard was named co-principal investigator on a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to form the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE), along with faculty at the University of Washington, Colorado School of Mines, and Howard University. More recently (2011) she was named as co-PI of a national NSF innovation center (Epicenter), and leads an NSF program at Stanford on summer research experiences for high school teachers.

Molly Bullock Zielezinski

Molly Bullock Zielezinski

Molly Bullock Zielezinski, MA.T, is interested in the long-term impact of Design Thinking on K-12 education--for administrators, teachers, and students alike. She is a PhD student in Learning Sciences and Technology Design with a cross-specialization in Curriculum Studies. Molly is passionate about the role of Design Thinking in curriculum and school redesign, specifically how the use of human-centered, empathy driven protocols can revolutionize traditional problem solving and collaboration. As a former elementary and middle school mathematics and science educator, she has first-hand experience with the positive student transformations resulting from the introduction of Design Thinking protocols and mindsets into the classroom. Additionally, Molly is interested in teachers and students utilizing new technologies in meaningful ways to augment instruction and improve meaningful student outcomes.

Stephanie Bachas-Daunert

Stephanie Bachas-Daunert

Stephanie Bachas-Daunert is a PhD candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. Her interdisciplinary work spans engineering, environmental and public health, microbiology, and biogeochemistry. She graduated cum laude from Princeton University with a B.S.E. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and a certificate in Environmental Studies, and received her Masters in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University. Stephanie has held officer positions in chapters of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers, as well as led engineering-related outreach and mentoring efforts. She is passionate about increasing diversity in STEM fields, and started outreach in East Palo Alto through the NSF-funded Stanford REDLab Educating Young STEM Thinkers project in an effort to introduce STEM topics to underrepresented groups and mentor the future generation of scientists and engineers. Stephanie holds a National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirschstein Predoctoral Fellowship, and is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow (NSF GRFP) as well as a Stanford School of Engineering 3D Diversity Fellow.

Tanner Vea

Tanner Vea

Tanner Vea is a PhD candidate in Learning Sciences and Technology Design. His interests include learning in STEM domains and ethics, particularly in the context of animals and the environment. He also designs and researches learning environments that encourage ethical thinking and action in the context of STEM-based inquiry. He is interested in how design thinking can be used to help people learn about and care for the natural world. Tanner received his M.A. in Instructional Technology and Media from Teachers College, Columbia University. Before that, Tanner earned his B.A. in Media and Culture from Bard College and worked on the interactive team at WNET in New York, where he was an Emmy-nominated interactive producer for the PBS program Nature and the PBS KIDS program Cyberchase.

Zaza Kabayadondo

Zaza Kabayadondo

Zaza Kabayadondo is in her final year of the PhD in Learning Sciences and Technology Design. Her doctoral work has focused on tracking how adults learn to be creative and entrepreneurial. The fieldwork for this project has taken her to Zimbabwe where she collaborates with medical professionals, musicians and actors to help them transform their daily practices. Zaza has been a member of the REDlab since 2009 and her time at Stanford has been spent exploring the science of how people learn and how to better design technologies to enhance that learning. She's looking forward to applying that expertise in EdTech consulting, instructional design and research and development for up and coming creative communities. On her days off, she trains for the SF Marathon and works on the perfect tiramisu recipe.

Affiliated Alumni/ae

Tim Huang, Aaron Loh